Learning to Fly

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Thu Feb 11, 2016 10:43 pm

Flying Lesson 35: Cross Country Navigation 7 – The Qualifying Cross Country. 10th of February 2016.

The weather today was much like my dual cross country, scarcely believable given the weather we have been having recently. That meant it was time for the final big hurdle to getting my PPL, excluding the final skills test of course; the Qualifying Cross Country (QXC). The route is exactly the same as that of lesson 34 except this time I’m going to be on my own.

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The QXC Route drawn on Google maps

I got up at my normal time for work (05:35 if you are wondering) to check the weather, the theory being that if the weather was rubbish that I could just go to work rather than taking the day off. The TAFs (Terminal Aerodrome Forecasts) and METARs (Meteorological Terminal Aviation Routine Weather Reports) all looked good so I got another hour and a half in bed before getting my backside moving and off to Humberside. My instructor John was going above and beyond the call today, Wednesday is his weekend but as the weather was good he wanted to get me away on my QXC, thanks John.

The first job was to get PJ fuelled up so after phoning Leicester and Peterborough Conington to make sure that they were operational, checking the checking the NOTAMs (NOTices To Air Men) and then the METARs and TAFs again before booking out with air traffic control.

Getting PJ off the grass parking area could have been entertaining due to the amount of rain we have had of late but once she was thoroughly warmed up and with the permission of air traffic plenty of power got her rolling and I was away, well to taxy around the airport to park on the GA apron for fuel, it was quite busy today (first good day in a while) so there was a queue for the fuel tanker, still my full A checks were done by the time the tanker driver got around to me so I could get on and go as soon as he had handed me the fuel receipt.

Internal checks completed and PJs Continental O-200 is purring away as always as the wind is westerly which means a runway two six departure, I complete my pre-departure checks at holding point alpha on the main runway (which I will use to taxy to runway two six that crosses the main runway) with clearance from air traffic control I taxyed PJ to the hold on runway two six, aligned the direction indicator (DI) with the compass and switched the transponder to ALT (mode Charlie; reports my altitude as well as the four digit squawk code).

“Golf-Papa-Juliet, cleared takeoff runway two six, wind two nine zero at nine”
“Golf-Papa-Juliet, roger, cleared takeoff”

With nothing else to check other than a cursory glance over the engine instruments to make sure I still had oil pressure (losing that would be bad – important safety tip) I opened the throttle and began my take off roll. Airspeed is alive, temps and pressures in the green, 55 knots, rotate, I’m airborne before the intersection and climbing away. Four weeks of climbing the walls wanting to get airborne melt away as I climb away from the runway at 500 feet per minute. No time to take in the sights though as the straight out climb means I am less than a mile away from my route start point; Brigg town centre. I turn onto my calculated heading, which conveniently points the nose at the West Burton power station which from my seat is directly behind Gainsborough; my first turning point. Hibaldstow parachute operations are active today (as per the NOTAM) but Humberside Radar ensures that I know, I’m well out of their zone anyway but it’s nice to have the information.

Humberside radar cautions me to slow moving traffic to my 12 o’clock ‘possibly a glider’. I confirm I have it in sight and that it is a glider, under aerotow.

Just after my turn south along the River Trent Humberside Radar tells me to Squawk 7000 (general conspicuity code) and free call Waddington Radar, they must be a bit busy today. With contact made and a new transponder code entered I continue south, on time at my halfway point, the northern edge of Newark a glance over my left shoulder and I can see Lincoln Cathedral almost glowing in the reflected sunlight. All along the route I am conducting regular FREDA checks (see previous posts) to ensure that all is good with the aircraft and the navigation. It isn’t long before I am passing the Waltham TV transmitter and Langar; they are also parachute dropping today so I make sure I am well clear of their airspace.

Once overhead Melton Mowbray, the leg taking 22 minutes I turned the aircraft towards Leicester and moved onto the Leicester radio frequency once I had reported to Waddington Radar that I was in visual contact with the airfield. They wanted me to join via the overhead and enter the traffic pattern rather than enter on right base as they were busy (lots of people taking advantage of the weather) What this means is overflying the airfield and descending on the dead side away from the circuit and flying around the airfield and entering cross wind on the pattern. This diagram I found on planeadventures explains it better than my words.

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The Overhead join courtesy of planeadventures

I set the altimeter to the airfield QFE so that when my wheels touch the runway the altimeter will read 0ft, rather than around 470ft which is the airfields elevation above sea level.

I perform a normal right hand circuit and landing at Leicester and park up at the rear of the terminal building and push PJ backwards onto the grass next to another C150/152 to avoid blocking the taxyway. I head inside to pay my landing fee and get my QXC form signed and stamped. I then headed to the Leicestershire Aero Club for a coffee and a bacon and egg buttie, and a fine buttie it was too (what you think I am going to fly all that way and not have one – pfft).

I headed back out to the aircraft after working out the next leg of my route to Peterborough Conington using the wind from the TAF at Wittering (now active again). Unfortunately I seemed to have found the boggyest part of the grass and PJ had sunk into it – bugger. A couple of chaps that had just parked up in a PA-28 tried in vain to help me shift PJ but any attempt was going to see her sink further into the mud. On the advice of their chief flying instructor (who was also helping to try and shift PJ) I went and found the airport fireman who grabbed the towing vehicle and pulled PJ out without any trouble at all. Brilliant, I thanked him then got on with my external checks.

I completed my normal pre-start checks and PJ fired up on the button and settled into a smooth idle and once warmed up I contacted Leicester Radio for the departure information and taxyed PJ to the holding point for runway two eight and commenced my pre departure run up checks, I was soon airborne again and heading east.

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PJ After being towed off the grass external checks complete.

Wittering Zone must have been on lunch because nobody answered when I called them on their frequency. Because of the left circuit departure I was north of track on my way out, I used the Eye Brook reservoir which my desired track passed straight over to map read back onto course and then following a FREDA check set course. The scenery below nicely lit by the mid-day (well early afternoon) sun gave me plenty of visual reference points. The Harringworth viaduct passed to my left and Rockingham Motor Speedway to my right I could also clearly make out Rutland Water out to my left. I passed Oundle and soon Peterborough Conington came into view, on their instructions I entered via the overhead again and descended to circuit height on the dead side being careful to avoid directly overflying Holme as per the noise abatement sheets in my Pooleys Guide.

I was number two to another C150/C152 in the pattern so I extended my downwind a little to give me a better chance of not having to go around, thankfully he extended his landing run and pulled off at a holding point at the far end of the runway so that I could land and backtrack rather than having to perform a go-around - top man; thanks. I parked up on the grass as instructed and shut PJ down. Thankfully when I got out of the aircraft it felt much firmer than Leicester, I headed to the tower/clubhouse to pay my landing fee, get my form signed and plan the next leg of my route; the return to Humberside.

With a bru in hand I checked the high level wind charts and did my calculations. It double checked it but it was no good due to the 25kt wind at 2000ft I would be eating into my reserve on the way in to Humberside (by a maximum of 13 minutes if my calculations were correct). One of the most useless things in aviation is the fuel in the bowser so I requested 20 litres of 100LL which made sure I had enough plus a reserve to get back, fuel is one of those things that I’d rather have a bit more than I need so that when I arrive at Humberside I still have a minimum of one hours reserve, with an extra 20 litres of fuel on board PJ will have 1 hour 47 minutes of fuel endurance remaining (85 litres total capacity with 80 litres usable), the aircraft has a 2.5L sump in each wing tank. The sump is below the fuel outlet that feeds the engine and it is there to catch any water or contaminants that manage to get into the fuel tanks, this prevents it from getting into the fuel lines.

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PJ parked at Peterborough Conington after refuelling

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The view from the pilots seat over the apron at Peterborough Conington

Pre start checks complete I move to the holding point and begin my pre-departure checks. Everything looks good so I radio the tower and I am soon on my way. I depart via the overhead being careful to avoid Conington and later Holme as I climb out, though by the time I am crossing the airfield I am well over 1500ft anyway, still best to not annoy the neighbours unnecessarily. Once clear of the overhead departure I inform Conington radio that I am leaving the circuit to the north and switch over to Wittering Zones frequency, they talk to me this time and I am soon clear of the pan handle of their MATZ and well north of Peterborough. The controller asks me to report abeam Spalding, the Deeping Fen windfarm slips by on my left and Spalding which was on the horizon moments ago is now filling the lower right of the windscreen.

Once abeam Spalding I am told to squawk 7000 and free call Coningsby Radar; I was hoping he would hand me over, must have been busy. I switch frequencies and make contact with Coningsby Radar, I get my clearance to transit the MATZ (Military Air Traffic Zone) and carry on north, my next turning point being overhead RAF Coningsby. I’m warned of some traffic 1 mile to my left, which I catch sight of and confirm to radar, another light aircraft. RAF Coningsby is now in view and I track towards it as one of the longer navigation legs is nice to see that my distance time calculations are correct (2000ft wind on the Met office briefing form must have been correct) as I am on time for the distance markers placed on the track lines on the map. As I pass over the top of RAF Coningsby I see a pair of Typhoons landing; nice I’d never seen one from above before.

I perform a FREDA check before I re-set the stop watch and turn onto my new heading; back towards Humberside. Caistor Radar sticks out on the horizon so as well as keeping my heading it is a useful point to steer towards as it is under my track. Coningsby Radar is helpful and hand me over to Humberside Radar. A short time later I have passed by Market Raisen and I am handed over to Humberside Tower as I pass the Caistor Radar, following me reporting the field in sight. I position for left base on runway two six and complete my pre landing checks as I descended from 2000ft to the circuit height of 1000ft. I report to the tower as instructed when I am on left base and then again on final approach, a normal flaps 20 final approach and a nice smooth landing, not quite a greaser but never the less a good un, to be honest they all were. I taxy back to the grass parking area after waiting for a Cessna Citation business jet to depart and tie PJ down and debrief with John in the club cabin.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Sat Feb 13, 2016 6:10 pm

Flying Lesson 36: General Handling Revision 1 (Dual). 12th of February 2016.

Today was another good weather day, the odd cumulus cloud floating around below 3000ft but most of it was scattered / broken above 3000ft. The wind was only 6 knots and it was straight up and down runway zero eight.

On the cards today; steep turns (45 degree angle of bank), stalls, incipient spins (recovery), stalls with flaps and stalls with and without power. Finishing with a practice forced landing and a low level return to base.

After a pre-flight checks and warm up I taxyed PJ to runway 08 for the pre-departure checks. With the checks complete and clearance to take off given I accelerated down the runway and took off, PJ climbed into the cool afternoon air, a left turn departure and climb to 2500ft for the first set of exercises in the north west training area. It has been a while since I have been in this area because the last 15+ hours have been navigation training.

This lesson was all about brushing up on skills already learned through the early stages of flight training in order to get me up to test standard. The idea being that it is fresh in my mind and I shouldn't encounter anything in the test that I haven’t done in the training. You naturally become rusty at these sorts of thing as they are not something that you practice on every single flight but are important if you want to be a safe pilot.

By the end of the lesson the rust had been polished of the upper air manoeuvres and John instructed me to fly straight and level for a bit, I knew what was coming, it was just a matter of when. This was my first practiced forced landing in a while and I would have gotten in the selected field had and I quote “not pissed about waiting to get the flaps down” more practice required there I think. I climbed the aircraft to 600ft and throttled back to minimum safe cruise (2100rpm, flaps 10 degrees) for a low level RTB and crosswind landing on runway two zero.

My next lesson will be mostly practice forced landings and then general handling practice solo.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby badhand » Sun Feb 14, 2016 2:13 pm

Hey Moxy,

I've just designed an App for the CAA to keep you pilot types abreast of all the latest news, safety alerts, consultations, rule changes and airspace amendments etc. Its good stuff. If you haven't got it already, download it here:

http://skywise.caa.co.uk/

Love to know what you think of it...

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Sun Feb 14, 2016 6:33 pm

badhand wrote:Hey Moxy,

I've just designed an App for the CAA to keep you pilot types abreast of all the latest news, safety alerts, consultations, rule changes and airspace amendments etc. Its good stuff. If you haven't got it already, download it here:

http://skywise.caa.co.uk/

Love to know what you think of it...


Looks like a useful app. Unfortunately I am one of those weardo types that has a windows phone and no apple or android devices...

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby badhand » Tue Feb 16, 2016 10:27 am

We could have developed for windows devices had there been a demand for it, but it seems its only you that wants it.

Weirdo! :lol:

And so far, download stats indicate that an overwhelming amount of pilots prefer Apple over Android.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Tue Feb 16, 2016 8:36 pm

badhand wrote:We could have developed for windows devices had there been a demand for it, but it seems its only you that wants it.

Weirdo! :lol:

And so far, download stats indicate that an overwhelming amount of pilots prefer Apple over Android.


Yeah that doesn't surprise me. Lots of pilots use Pooleys iPlates which obviously is Apple only. I think Sky Daemon is an Apple only application as well. There will come a time when I will have to probably sully myself with an iPad of some description.

I don't know if there is any truth in it but I have heard that windows phone is being dropped from Nokia (the only reason I have a windows phone) so I might end up with an Android phone at some point anyway.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Sat Feb 27, 2016 12:04 pm

Flying Lesson 37: General Handling Revision 2 (Dual). 25th of February 2016.

Last Friday the weather was appalling so I didn’t get to fly, this week the forecast was better so I booked the afternoon off work so I could grab a couple of flying lessons.

Up first, general handling revision part 2; this is a dual training session where we will be mostly practicing forced landings (PFL). I say mostly because we have a full flap stall to do first.

I won’t go into the usual parts of the flight such as the A-checks, taxi and take off as that is done on every flight and I think I have covered it enough.

Once over the north-west training area the first bit of the lesson was the full flap stall, this is recovered at the stall warning horn rather than holding onto it until the aircraft decides it’s had enough, throttle back to 1,900 rpm, carb heat hot lower the flaps all the way to 40 degrees, throttle 1,500rpm carb heat cold (it has slowed down below 60 knots by this time) holding at 1,500rpm until eventually BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP the stall warner lets you know that you are being foolish, throttle up to full power, airspeed increasing, flaps up to 30, bit more airspeed, flaps 20, bit more airspeed, flaps 10, bit more airspeed, flaps up and recover into the climb.

No point dwelling on that so it’s onto the practice forced landing, its and old joke but one I had to get in:
Image

Seriously though, being able to land an aircraft in a field if the engine does decide to stop is no laughing matter and something that as a pilot I have to take seriously and be able to do; it requires practice and I will have to do a practice forced landing on my General Flying Skills Test.

So there I am cruising along and John says “practice engine failure” pulls the carb heat to hot and the throttle back to idle. I trim out for a 65 knot (best glide speed) decent and then you investigate why it went wrong, is the fuel on, is the mixture rich, is the car heat on, pump the throttle, pump the primer; no dice its dead as a door nail. The propeller would continue to windmill (the compression ratio in these engines is very low) if it were anything other than the engine seizing up. At the same time as this I am looking for a field to land in, with one sorted it is a case of not putting the aircraft in a position where you can’t see it. If you can’t see one immediately you turn downwind (so you have a tail wind) and start looking for one. If you don’t know the wind direction it’s a case of looking for references, surface ripples on lakes, smoke/steam from power stations and the like. It’s always best to land into wind if you can.

Ohh and the best time of year for an engine failure (if there is a best time) is after the corn harvests as there are plenty of nice stubble fields to land in (depending where you are of course).

If the engine can’t be re-started then a mayday call has to be made to the controller you are talking to, if you get no response or aren’t talking to anybody in particular you set the radio and transponder to the general emergency frequency and code and go from there. At this point all non essentials (navigation radios, lights you don’t need etc. are turned off). Now you have to get the aircraft in. You fly a normal glide approach to the field (might be a circuit, might be straight in) using the flaps to slow the aircraft as needed, if it is very windy you might not need them at all. On final approach you do your crash drills; brakes: off, fuel: off, mixture: lean, magnetos; off, electrical equipment: off (lights and radio), hatches: unlocked, harness: very tight, flaps: as required and when you know you are in and don’t need to move the flaps any more you switch the master power off.

Of course we just talk through those on a PFL as stopping the engine at low altitude without good reason would be a bad idea. I throttle up and climb out gradually retracting the flaps as I bring the aircraft into a full power climb.

After an hour of PFLs it was time to return to Humberside, the return was done low level. The landing was a crosswind (it was 90 degrees to the runway) on runway two zero which was a good one according to John, as the aircraft needed fuel I back tracked on runway two zero and parked on the southern apron so that P-J could be re-fuelled.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Sat Feb 27, 2016 12:05 pm

Flying Lesson 38: General Handling Revision Solo. 25th of February 2016.

After heading back to the club cabin (the aircraft needed fuel) for a drink and a snack (banana if it matters) and a chat about the last flight it was my turn to go and do some PFL’s solo. After a transit check and run up checks the fully fuelled P-J was once again heading skywards with me on solo at the controls again; I love being up here on my own – did I mention that :) .

I initially climbed to 2500ft, I’d do subsequent ones from 2000ft; the time saved means I can get an extra one in at the end. I managed seven in total, the first three were questionable if I am honest the last two were pretty much spot on the fourth and fifth well, I would have gotten in but it’s likely the aircraft would have been parked in a hedge at the end of the landing run. That being said it’s better to roll into a hedge/fence at the end of a landing run than clip one with the undercarriage on the way in.

I won’t go into all the details again (I’d just be repeating myself over the previous blog entry) however a few points on selecting the right field, long and flat are the better options however there is more to consider. Firstly, obstacles; are there any power lines, telephone lines, trees hedges, ruts (some fields have elevated tracks running through the middle of them for example) or ditches. What is in the field, tall crops or short crops, no crops at all, is it fallow (long grass and crops can hide obstacles, are there patches of water (indicates the ground will be very soft). At this time of year following the rain we have had means the water table is very high many of the fields are very water logged. Many of the fields in the NW training area were full of huge patches of water, land in one of those and it is likely the aircraft will simply dig in and flip over no matter how soft the landing.

I returned to the Humberside low level the same as the previous lesson and managed to sneak in, in front of the KLM hopper, which was great as it meant I didn’t have to sit and fly in circles whilst the wake turbulence cleared.

A good couple of lessons today I feel far better about the PFLs which if I am honest are the only bit of the flight test I am remotely concerned about.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Sat Feb 27, 2016 12:05 pm

Flying Lessons 39 & 40: Circuit Revision Dual and Solo. 26th of February 2016.

Here we are, the last of the revision sessions before my mock test as the title says this part of the revision is circuit drills focussing on the landings that I don’t do that often, short field and glide approach (we have no need to do either at Humberside as the runways are long and there are no obstacles that require the steep glide approach to get over them. However, not all runways are like that, ohh and glide approaches are fun.

After the usual brief, checking of the tech logs and booking out onto the circuit, A-checks etc. I took us up into the circuit. The first landing approach technique to do was a short field approach. Short field approaches are used for landing at an aerodrome where as you might imagine (and rather obviously) the runway is short, the idea is to drag the aircraft in on the prop and touch-down as slow as is safely possible (within the weight and performance limits of the aircraft).

It starts off following the same procedure of a normal 20 degree of flap approach except as the name of the technique suggests but you lower the flaps to 30 and then to 40 as you come in on final approach. More power is added to counter the increased drag of the 40 degrees of flap. The power is cut to idle later than normal as you have to fly the aircraft down onto the runway because once the power is off, the speed drops off quickly.

After two of those and a practice engine failure on take-off, we moved on to glide approaches, these are great fun because with 40 degrees of flap deployed on a glide approach the aircraft does a marvellous impersonation of a Ju-87 Stuka. The turn onto base is done earlier so that the turn onto final approach will be around half a mile rather than one mile and rather than reducing the power its cut to idle. The flaps are lowered to 10 degrees on base as normal, and the radio call for final approach is made on the end of the base leg rather than on the final approach because you simply wouldn’t have time to do that on such a short approach.

The drag I countered with extra power on the short field landings now becomes my best friend as it keeps the speed down on the steep descent and allows the aircraft to slow down quickly when you flare. After three of those Jon left and wandered back to the club cabin and I went off to repeat the exercise on my own.

So there we are then, 47 hours 10 minutes total of which 12 hours 35 minutes are solo. It has been just over a year since I took my trial flight.

Next will be a mock test that could cover anything that I have done in the training, I expect both it and the real test to cover it all then there are no surprises.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Tue Apr 05, 2016 9:31 pm

Flying Lesson 41: Mock Test. 2nd of April 2016
After five weeks of not flying I get a call from the flying club “We can do your mock test now if you want as we have just had a cancellation due to a car breakdown” naturally I high tailed it to the flying club.

The planning time was less that it would be for the actual test as the route was already marked out on my map, all I had to do was work out the appropriate heading to steer relative to the wind and ground speeds so that I could work out the time on route and how much fuel would be required and hence the weight and balance of the aircraft, I will have to do all of this on the day of the actual test because I won’t know the route until the examiner says where he wants me to go. Whilst I was doing my flight planning Jon moved PJ onto the GA Apron for fuel. By the time he had come back I had the weight and balance, performance calculations and the navigation plog ready, pre-flight briefing and documentation review complete it was off to the aircraft for the flying part.

I won’t go into the specifics of the test, nor will I reveal Jon’s mock test route (that just wouldn’t be sporting), needless to say that it covers everything that you have learned so far. Jon is thorough and teaches a lot of bits that aren’t actually tested as it makes for safer pilots in the long run. A few points of note where I messed up. Yes unfortunately I would have failed if it were a real test – but that is where the mock test comes in, to find these problems and address them before the actual test so that you don’t fail:

* My first steep turn resulted in 150ft altitude loss because I didn’t apply enough aft elevator movement on the Yoke.
* I managed to balls up my stall recovery (for instance on a stall in a shallow turn I began the recovery actions before the speed had increased after the power was put back on; a big no-no).
* I completely fluffed the crash drills on the practiced forced landing; Fuel off, mixture lean, throttle closed, all non-essential electrical items off, harnesses tight, hatches unlatched, flaps as required, master power off.

Everything else went pretty well with only a few minor observations.

I was a bit pissed off with myself if I am honest, but the key is not to let it eat away at me and before the actual flight test I will be doing another hour of dual general handling to get the bugs ironed out, with that bit of extra training I should be in a very good position to do my general skills test, I just hope the weather holds.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Sat Apr 09, 2016 8:17 pm

Flying Lesson 42: General handling revision, Dual. 9th of April 2016
After a few issues were uncovered after last week’s mock test, I got a break in the weather today and I was able to do some General Handling revision to sort that out. PJ hadn’t been flown that day so after a discussion of what we needed to do it was out to do the checks, John as usual to speed things up handled the fuel and oil checks and I got on with the rest of them. With everything checking out and the normal run up and taxy checks done we were away, I climbed to 2500ft and headed to the training area.

First on the agenda was steep turns, I accomplished these without too much of an issue, last week’s error was not enough back pressure, next it was on to sorting out stalls and their recovery, first a couple of full stalls (going all the way through with the nose dropping) and then incipient stalls (correcting at the first sign of the stall) in the approach configuration, full flap and approach configuration in a slight turn. Again remembering last week’s error I managed to do these without any real difficulty. Next a bit of unusual attitude recovery, nose up and nose down. John also had me do a radio navigation fix.

Finished off with a practice forced landing and a low level return to the airport. To complete two landings (one circuit); a short field landing first and then after the circuit a glide approach and it was back to the club cabin for a brew and a discussion of the flight.

John is now happy that I will be able to get through the test so all I have to do is wait for a date (sort out with my diary, the examiners diary and the flying clubs diary). Oh and good ‘ole mother nature, if the weather would play ball, that would be grand.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Sun Apr 17, 2016 2:36 pm

The weather smiled on me this morning and I finally got to go and do my PPL(A) skills test. I PASSED :rock
A better write up to follow.

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby cati » Sun Apr 17, 2016 8:11 pm

well done moxy! you can fly down to goodwood to join us for breakfast !!!

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby badhand » Sun Apr 17, 2016 8:16 pm

Well done Moxy!

Does that mean they'll let you out to play in the sky on your own now?

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Re: Learning to Fly

Postby mattmoxon » Sun Apr 17, 2016 9:41 pm

badhand wrote:Well done Moxy!

Does that mean they'll let you out to play in the sky on your own now?


Yep, I am certified (or is that certifiable) to go an have fun on my own, and with passengers (for anybody brave enough).

I can't wait to spread my wings (sorry awful pun) and start going to different places.


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